The best of times, the worst of times: how good can possibly come of Covid-19 (eventually)

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, itContinue reading “The best of times, the worst of times: how good can possibly come of Covid-19 (eventually)”

Listen up, here’s a way to help others through the Coronavirus crisis

“What we try to do in the face of very difficult conversations is we try to make things better…What makes something better is connection.” Brené Brown (professor and writer on courage and authenticity). It’s mid-March 2020 and we’re in the midst of a global pandemic. We’re all hunkering down, fearful of the future. Worried aboutContinue reading “Listen up, here’s a way to help others through the Coronavirus crisis”

Which time would you prefer: “kairos” or “chronos”?

Thank you David, or interviewee 62 (if I refer to my list). Oh yes, I have a spreadsheet. I was listening back to a recording I made last week (I have these too) and was taken by something David said. We were talking about difficult times. Me: “What helps you get through them?” David: “AcceptingContinue reading “Which time would you prefer: “kairos” or “chronos”?”

Regrets? We have a few, so make them count

Edith Piaf once sang “Non, je ne regrette riens,” but in my Spoon by Spoon conversations I’m finding we all regret a bit. I ask my interviewees, “If you could have your time over again, what would you do differently?” At least half launch into a list of things they would change: different choices, different actions,Continue reading “Regrets? We have a few, so make them count”

Spoon by Spoon: why we must feed ourselves with wisdom

Human beings are poorly named. We are more comfortable “doing” than “being”. We rush from place to place, rarely stopping to smell the roses. When we ask each other “how are you?” we love to say, “oh you know, just really busy.” American author Annie Dillard once said, “How we spend our days, is ofContinue reading “Spoon by Spoon: why we must feed ourselves with wisdom”